Abrams, Harold
Ain, Gregory
Alexander, Robert E.
Antelline, Jon P.
Applebaum, Norm
Batter-Kay Associates
Beadle, Alfred
Beckett, Welton
Benedict, Hiram Hudson
Bird, Fujimoto & Fish
Bonini, Vincent
Brownell, J. Herbert
Buff, Straub and Hensman
Campbell, Donald
Cody, William F.
Crane, Loch
Davis, Ronald K.
Decker, Arthur
Deems-Lewis
Delawie, Homer
Des Lauriers, Robert
Drake, Gordon
Eckel, George
Eggers, Henry
Ellwood, Craig
Ferris, Robert
Fickett, Edward
Forester, Russell
Fowble, Robert
French, Stanley J.
Frey, Albert
Gill, Irving
Goldberg, Bertrand
Goldman, Donald
Gordon, Kenneth & Robert
Grossman, Greta
Hagadone, Walter
Harris, Harwell Hamilton
Henderson, John
Hester, Henry
Hope, Frank
Hufbauer, Clyde
Hubbell, James
Jackson-Scott
Jones, A. Quincy
Jones, Robert E.
Kahn, Louis
Kellogg, Dick
Kellogg, Kendrick Bangs
Kesling, William
Killingsworth, Brady & Smith
Kowalski, Joseph
Krisel, William
Ladd, Thornton
Lareau, Richard
Lautner, John
Leitch, Richard
Liebhardt, Frederick
Livingstone, Fred
Loring, Arthur
Lotery, Rex
Lykos, George
Macy, Al
Malone, Ed
Matthews, Roger
May, Cliff
McKim, Paul
Mitchell, Delmar
Mock, John
Mortenson, John
Mosher & Drew
Naegle, Dale
Neutra, Richard
Norris, Fred
Paderewski, CJ
Patrick, William
Paul & Allard
Paulson, Ted
Periera & Luckman
Platt, Robert
Ray, Eugene
Reed, John
Richards, Sim Bruce
Risley and Gould
Rosser, William
Ruocco, Lloyd
Salerno, Daniel
Schindler, Rudolph
Schoell & Geritz
Sigurdson, John
Simpson and Gerber
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
Soriano, Raphael
Spencer & Lee
Stone, Edward Durrell
Therkelsen, Lloyde
Tucker, Sadler & Bennett
Turner, Herb
Veitzer, Leonard
Vickery, Dean
Weir Brothers
Weston, Eugene III
Wheeler, Richard
Wright, Frank Lloyd
Wright, John Lloyd
Wright, Lloyd
Wulff and Fifield

Frank Lewis Hope Jr. (1901 - 1994)


The FutureCraft Home (1959)

Large local architectural firms, who met the challenges of a rapidly growing San Diego dominated the local building explosion in the decades following World War II. Larger firms like Wheeler and Associates; Mosher & Drew; Tucker, Sadler, & Bennett; Delawie, Macy & Henderson; Deems-Martin (and Lewis) and Frank L. Hope & Associates competed against one another and firms from across the nation vying for the work.

Though the 1950's and 1960's were times of great variability in the quality of local architecture. And while the out-of-towners like Pereira Luckman, Edward Durrell Stone, Louis Kahn and Richard Neutra are often referenced in connection to this period’s cornerstone projects, works done by local architects of that era are outstanding. Frank Hope’s career precedes that of corporate interests hiring out of town big firms for their buildings and provided an important training ground for a generation of architects.

Hope, who retired in 1966 and died in 1994 at the age of 93 continued to watch the next generation - Frank Hope Jr., an architect, and Chuck B. Hope, a structural engineer - take over ownership of the company and expand it. The Hope firm peaked in size in the 1980s with 150 employees. Noted designers Gary Allen (who designed San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium), C.W. Kim and Robert Bell all cut their teeth under the Hope banner. While Hope Sr. only caught the beginning of San Diego's modern building boom, Frank Jr. headed the company during the city's 1970s and 1980s explosion.

Frank Lewis Hope, Jr. was born to Frank Lewis Hope (1873-1943) in 1901 in San Bernadino and moved to San Diego in 1913 when his father moved to San Diego as a traffic agent for the Santa Fe Railway. Hope attended San Diego High School up to his sophomore year, dropping out that year to work in the Navy shipyards during World War I. Mr. Hope later went on to attend Cal for two years, and the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh for one year but stopped short of earning a degree.

After school Hope held the positions of draftsman, superintendant, and specification writer for Requa and Jackson, Architects starting in 1925.  His time with Richard Requa, Herbert Jackson, Lillian Rice and William Wheeler likely informed his approach to architecture and interest in Mediterranean modes.

After passing the state architect exam, Hope launched his own firm, Frank L. Hope & Associates, Architects & Engineers located in the Spreckles Building in 1928.

According the Los Angeles Times, “…When Frank Sr. opened his business in 1928, San Diego was still small (the 1930 census counted a population of 148,000), and the scale of development was modest compared to today. He built his business mostly by designing houses and churches in traditional styles, including a Mediterranean mode he learned during his years in the offices of San Diego architects Requa & Jackson, Lillian Rice and William H. Wheeler between 1925-28. It is likely that much of his architecture education came under Requa and Jackson, with whom he began his career as an architect after working in the design department of a shipbuilding company during World War I.”

But Hope also had a modern side. By the late 1930s, he began designing Streamline Moderne houses as well as buildings including a Ford-Lincoln automobile outlet that once stood at 12th Avenue and Broadway downtown, and Grossmont Union High School's auditorium-gymnasium. In 1940, the firm secured the remodeling of the First National Trust & Savings Bank of San Diego in order to give the building a more streamlined appearance. Many of the ornamental features of the building were removed from the exterior and replaced with a sleek tile-covered exterior atop a ceramic (veneer) and black granite base.

Because of the bad economy during the depression, finding work was hard to come by and Hope worked on many projects remodeling and renovating storefronts. In 1930, Hope was given a project to design the Spanish-styled Carmelite Monastery in Normal Heights. From this point forward, Frank Hope Sr. worked closely with the San Diego Roman Catholic Diocese designing several buildings. These projects included the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Ocean Beach (1946), our Lady of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in City Heights (1947), The San Diego College for Women (1950) and the Immaculata at the University of San Diego (1964).

Frank Hope Sr. is one of the few surviving direct links to a great era of modern architecture. He knew Irving Gill, San Diego's most influential architect, who died in 1936. "I was just a kid (when I met Gill)," he said. "I remember him coming in and standing by my drafting board one time. I think he was trying to show me something about a house I was working on. He kept putting landscaping around it, and I don't know if he was trying to hide it or just show me how it could look better."

And once he showed Frank Lloyd Wright around town when the famous architect visited San Diego. "I had him in my car," Frank Hope Sr. recalled, "and at one point, we went by some building, and he said, 'When I die, I'll probably go down to the deepest part of hell. I invented this modern architecture, and look what they've done to it!"

Frank Hope Sr. never considered himself a gifted designer. Frank Hope Jr., who graduated with an architecture degree from UC Berkeley, was "far ahead of me," according to the Hope patriarch. But, in their humble way, the modest homes and churches Frank Hope Sr. worked on have more humanity and charm than the big corporate edifices designed by the company under Frank Hope Jr.

In 1953, Hope’s son, Frank L. Hope Jr., joined the firm and later changed the name of the company to The Hope Consulting Group (AKA Hope Design Group).

Partial List of San Diego Projects

Aquarium Museum Building (ca. 1950)
Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Arts & Crafts Press. Photo by Darren Bradley

Arts & Crafts Press Building (1963)
Kettner

Bruce, Dr. Clinic Building

Bullard, Dr. Clinic Building


Bureau of Fisheries, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Research Laboratory (1963)
Scripps Institute of Oceanography

Burnham Building (1962)
1555 6th Avenue


Cabrillo National Monument Visitors Center

Cabrillo National Monument Visitors Center (1966)
Cabrillo Monument, Point Loma

Carmelite Monastery of San Diego (1930)
Normal Heights

Children’s Hospital, Diagnostic and Treatment Center and New Child Guidance
Clinic (1968)

Coronado Hospital (1972)

Courthouse Facility for the County of San Diego (1956)
Designed by Hamill, Hope, Lykos, Wheeler, Freeland and Associated Architects and Engineers

Dana Junior High School (1941)


Fares Co Inc Department Store

Fares Co. Inc.
El Cajon Blvd.

Federal Bureau of Prisons
Federal Youth Center, Pleasanton CA

Fenton, Miss L. G., Residence (1928)
Plumosa Park, lot 9, block M


First Federal Savings and Loan

First Federal Savings and Loan Branch (1963)
Broadway & H, Chula Vista

First National Bank Building (formerly Columbia Centre)
on Columbia Street


First National Bank, D Street in Encinitas

First National Bank
D Street, Encinitas

Ford-Lincoln Store (AKA City Motors Ford) (late 1930s)
12th Avenue and Broadway – demolished

FutureCraft Home AKA Chambers Steel House  (1959)
4196 Eastridge Drive, La Mesa
First light-steel House in San Diego
Published in San Diego & Point March, 1959

Golden, M.H. Residence
3614 Carleton

Grossmont Union High School Auditorium-Gymnasium (1935-37)
La Mesa
Works Projects Administration (WPA) project

Hallmark House for Mitchell Realty (1962)
6th & Cedar


The Hogle Building. Rendering by John R. Mock

Hogle Building

Holy Cross Mausoleum (1938, 1963-1964)


Home Federal Savings, Downtown San Diego

Home Federal Savings and Loan Association (1963)
707 Broadway, San Diego

Hope Office Building Building (1961)
1447 Sixth Avenue


Chuck B. Hope Residence

Hope, Chuck B. Residence (ca. 1962)
676 Albion Street, Point Loma

Hope, Frank L. Residence (1956)
371 San Fernando

Hope, Mr. and Mrs. Frank L., Residence (1947)
lots 14 and 15, block 126, Del Mar

Horace Mann Junior High School
54th Street

Hyatt La Jolla

Hyatt Torrey Pines

Immaculata Chapel (1964)
University of San Diego  

Immaculate Conception Church (1933)
Wright Street east of Magnolia,

Immaculate Conception Church (1936)
northeast corner of San Diego Ave. and Twiggs Street


San Diego Mesa College

Kearny Mesa Junior College (ca. 1961)

Kearny Senior High School and additions (1954-55)
Wellington & Tecolote, Linda Vista

La Jolla Cancer Research Center (1985)
La Jolla

La Jolla Presbyterian Church, Fellowship Hall (1961 and 1964-65)

Marriott Hotel
Next to the San Diego Convention Center

May Company (1959)
Mission Valley
Designed by Bill Lewis for LA-based AC MArtin (later of Deems-Lewis), Hope 'backstopped' the project locally


McGill Hall

McGill Hall AKA Psychology Building (1969)
John Muir College Campus at U.C. San Diego

Medical Building
First and Laurel


Mercy Hospital

Mercy Hospital
4077 5th Avenue

Mercy Hospital expansion (1966-1990)

Mesa Vista Psychiatric Hospital (1963)


National Cash Register (NCR), Rancho Bernardo

National Cash Register Co. Electronics Facility (NCR) (1969)
Rancho Bernardo

National Steel & Shipbuilding Corp Office Building
28th & Harbor Drive

Naval Electronics Maintenance School

Naval Training Center, Officer's Quarters

Nexus Science Center


Oceanside Federal Savings

Oceanside Federal Savings & Loan (1967)
716 Mission Avenue

Oliver, Lawrence Residence (1934)
815 Armada Terrace, Point Loma.

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church (1947)
Orange & Marlborough, City Heights 

Pacific Telephone
Oceanside Service Facility

Pacific Telephone (1959)
Chatsworth & Tennyson, Point Loma


Palomar Memorial Hospital

Palomar Memorial Hospital (1953-1974)
Escondido

Pastore, Mr. Caesar, store building (1936)
1st and Juniper Streets

Penguin House, San Diego Zoo (1959)
w/ zoo designer Charles Faust

Pickford, Mr. H. T. Apartment Hotel (1929)
Coronado

Point Loma High School Additions (1955)
2335 Chatsworth Blvd

Pomerado Hospital (1977)
Pomerado Road, Poway

Private Residence (1975)
10601 Noakes Road, La Mesa


Rancho Bernardo Villas

Rancho Bernardo Villas

Rosary Girl's High School
42nd & Polk

Sacred Heart Catholic Church (1946)
Ocean Beach 

Saint Charles Chapel Details (1937)

Saint Didacus Church (1927)
Southwest Corner Felton and Collier Streets

Saint Joseph’s Church Alterations (1931)

San Diego Centre City Project (1960 – 1964)
Designed by Curtis, Hope, Lodge and Freeland

San Diego City College

San Diego College for Women (1950)
Alcala Park, Linda Vista


San Diego Convention Hall

San Diego Convention Hall

San Diego High School Technical Arts Building


San Diego Stadium. Photograph by Julius Shulman

San Diego Stadium (1967)
9449 Friars Road, Mission Valley
AIA National Honor Award
San Diego Centre City Community Concourse, Convention Facility (1962)

San Marcos Post Office

San Diego State College Science Building


SDSU Music Building

San Diego State College Music Building

Santa Fe City Offices (1936)
1200 Fifth Avenue (NW Corner at B Street) - demolished

Scripps Clinic-Molecular Biology Building (1983)
La Jolla 

Scripps Hydraulics Lab (1964)
Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Scripps Memorial Hospital (1975)
La Jolla

Seaport Village

Security First National Bank (1962)
1044 Wall Street, La Jolla

Security Trust & Savings Bank
Escondido


Donald Sharp Memorial Hospital. Photograph by Julius Shulman

Sharp, Donald N. Memorial Hospital Maternity Wing (1961)
Linda Vista

Sharp, Donald N. Memorial Community Hospital (1967-1975)
Linda Vista

Silver Strand State Beach Campground

Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. Eddie, Apartment House (1929)

Solar Aircraft Company (1960)
Harbor Drive

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church (1928)   

Streamline Modern Houses (late 1930s)
Point Loma

Stromberg-Carlson (1959)
Hancock Street

Tappan, Mr. and Mrs. W.N. Residence (1928)
Loma Portal


Timken Museum of Art

Timken Museum AKA Putnam Foundation, Timken Gallery (1962-1965)
Balboa Park


Travelodge Headquarters, El Cajon

Travelodge Corporation International Headquarters (1962)
250 S. Travelodge Drive, El Cajon

Trinity Episcopal Church
845 Chestnut Street, Escondido


Trinity Lutheran Church

Trinity Lutheran Church (1959)
7210 Lisbon Street, San Diego


Turrentine Building. Rendering by John R. Mock

Turrentine Building (1963)
Pre-cast granite faced concrete block 1-story building.
4th & A

United California Bank Building
345 B Street, San Diego

United States National Bank
2nd Ave and Broadway

Utschig, Harold H. Residence
6089 La Jolla Scenic Drive


Valley Ho Restaraunt

Valley Ho Restaurant
Mission Valley

Veteran's Administration Hospital