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Original Renderings of Richard George Wheeler's Dean Hansen Residence in Point Loma (ca. 1950)

Monday July 28, 2014

The family that has owned Richard George Wheeler's Dean Hansen Residence in Point Loma will be putting it on the market soon. The first time in 45 years! Learn more HERE.

“Beyond the Supersquare,” a new exhitiong at the Bronx Museum of Arts takes on the utopian goals of Oscar Niemeyer and Le Corbusier. Niemeyer’s ‘superquadra’ housing blocks in Brasilia were originally designed as self-sufficient communities – where residents ‘never had to leave home.’ According to THIS ARTICLE, “But, of course, people like to leave home, and shop here and there, so the somewhat forced communalism that Niemeyer, a lifelong socialist, had envisioned quickly fell apart. Then, four years after the city’s debut, a military dictator came to power, Niemeyer left for Europe, and Brasilia’s bright moment was over.” Learn more about the show (that runs through next January) HERE.

In the years following World War II, The Harvard Five (Eliot Noyes, Philip Johnson, Landis Gores, John Johansen and Marcel Breuer) “…built homes for themselves and others that were nothing like the traditional clapboard Colonials with pitched roofs and many-paned windows that dotted the leafy town.” "The Harvard Five were the first generation to come out of Harvard after it converted to the Bauhaus method of teaching," which encouraged architecture students to "break the box...When the young architects returned from their World War II military service, they were able to buy relatively inexpensive land in New Canaan, he said. And after the war, they were eager to leave the past behind and look forward to the future.” William D. Earls, author of "The Harvard Five in New Canaan" (2006), told the Courant, “…the young architects have to be given credit for taking chances with their careers and reputations.” Eliot Noyes, for example, who was the first of the five to settle in New Canaan and built his first house in 1947, used his own houses as "experiments, with little regard for conventional public opinion," Earls writes.” While many of these homes have been demolished to make way for larger homes leveraging the growth in real estate values, there’s a small survey that captures there memories HERE. Read the full article HERE.


THREATENED: Lautner's Crippled Children's Center in Woodland Hills

Thursday July 24, 2014

Architect John Lautner’s Crippled Children’s Center (1979) is threatened with demolition by its new owners. The struggle to preserve the Woodland Hills structure is detailed in THIS LA TIMES article. If you are interested in living in a Lautner, the Foster Carling Residence (1947) is for sale HERE.

Coming this November, a new “…riveting biography of Le Corbusier…” titled Modern Man is headed to your hands or iPad. This “…penetrating psychological portrait of a true genius and constant self-inventor, as well as a sweeping tale filled with exotic locales, sex and celebrity (he was a lover of Josephine Baker), and high-stakes projects…” should be a fun read. Learn more HERE.

A new series of webinars on modern architecture launches on July 29 with a talk by author Alan Hess. The talks continue with Christine French (on 8/12) and a profile of Paul Williams’ La Concha motel on 9/9. Read more HERE.


Tonight at 6PM! The opening reception for 'Spitting in The Wind' at the Oceanside Museum of Art

Saturday July 12, 2014

The Oceanside Museum of Art has just opened a new show, ‘Spitting in the Wind: Art from the End of the Line’, celebrating the long-standing friendships between artists Richard Allen Morris (b. 1933), John Baldessari (b. 1931), Bob Matheny (b. 1929) and Russell Baldwin(1933-2008). The show, curated by Dave Hampton, highlights the astonishing range of work they created while living and working in San Diego. Read CityBeat's profile on the show HERE.

'Spitting in the Wind' run concurrently with Dave Hampton's other show - Climate Change. Check out the U-T's recent coverage of the show HERE.

Bauhaus influenced architect Donald Olsen was a professor at Cal and a designer of great Bay Area homes in the post-War years. Writer Pierluigi Serraino, author of NorCalMod: Icons of Northern California Modernism, and Julius Shulman: Modernism Rediscovered, recently published a new book Donald Olsen: Architect of Habitable Abstractions (William Stout, 2013) celebrating Olsen’s work and documents his little-known examples of high modernism in Northern California. Read an interview with Serraino about the Olsen story HERE.

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