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Robert Winsett Residence by Lloyde Therkelsen


Jungemann Residence by Lloyde Therkelsen

Friday November 26, 2010

Dean Marshall Interiors gained a great deal of notoriety for their published (and unpublished) projects suchs as Lloyde 'Whitey' Therkelsen's Jungemann Residence and Robert Winsett Residence. I am looking for any information on the life and career of Lloyde Therkelsen and information on these homes. Please email me here with any leads you may have.

In a recent search I found Richard W. Amero's biography of San Diego architecture critic James Britton. Collating his obituary, many of the articles Britton wrote as well as his own perceptions of Britton's motivations and strategy, Amero's portrait is the most complete digest of the man we have come to admire (he died in 1983). For nearly two decades real critique of San Diego's built environment has been absent - and probably for good reason as Britton made few friends in his scathing diatribes. Read more HERE.

With holiday shopping in the air, we thought we would try to help market a few things we like - and today it's our friends over at Mr. California leisure wear. The classic shirts introduced in the sixties by the Mr. California label are now as dated and unmistakably "vintage" as the leisure activities and methods for which they were designed. An historically recent development, spare time, that which is free from employment, appears to have lost ground. Americans now work more hours than anyone else, even the Japanese. But during the heyday of Mr. California, the philosophy surrounding idle time had blossomed into mid-century leisure culture. Through December 1st use discount code blackfriday2010 for 25% off! Check out the gear HERE.

If you haven't yet, consider joining the Friends of San Diego Architecture. Check out the calendar of forthcoming lectures HERE.

SOHO San Diego has a YouTube Channel hosting a number of interesting videos. Check it out HERE and consider making an end-of-year gift to the organization HERE.

We love this CURBED L.A. (or is it L.A. CURBED?)! Recent updates include homes by Carl Maston, Cliff May, Rudolf Schindler, Edward Fickett, Thornton Ladd (and others) with a great sense of humor! Check out their site HERE.

ACCORDING TO the blog Coronado Common Sense, the Coronado meeting to discuss historic home demolition (of Homer Delawie's Peterson Residence) went something like this: A few spoke in favor of demolishing the home-owners Mark & Margarita Gosselin, their attorney Mark Dillon, their Solana Beach architect Craig Friehauf and their realtor Scott Aurich.Someone against the demolition mentioned on the microphone that they all stood to profit from this deal. While most of those involved spoke about the insignificance of the house and the architect who built it, it was the testimony from Mrs. Gosselin that caught my attention. She told how the house has cost them $1.7M (which I felt was an inexpensive amount in the Coronado market). She said that they only purchased the house with the intent to tear it down (testimony from others indicated that they promised the sellers they would not). She and her husband both said that they had no idea it was historical, yet they were in session with the California State Historical Resources Commission (SHRC) and had avoided one hearing because they needed more time to gather more facts. And the purpose of this Council meeting hearing was to activate a demo permit and demolish the home today (before the SHRC met again). But Mrs. Gosselin's most interesting statement was that the denial of this demo permit would cause a hardship.

Have you been to the Marston House lately? And did you know that beyond the fantastic architecture of the Hebbard & Gill designed (ca. 1904) home, redwood furniture designed by Irving J. Gill is on view. A bed, dining room server, three chairs with cowhide upholstery and an occasional table that the architect designed for the 1907 Wheeler J. Bailey house in La Jolla are on loan from Bailey's family to Save Our Heritage Organisation, the new operator of the historic Marston House Museum. Gill's rare, rudimentary furniture reflects the Arts and Crafts spirit of the home, but contrasts with the polished craftsmanship of the Marston House's redwood- and oak-paneled interior. However, the unvarnished, nailed-together furniture suited the rustic character of the Bailey house and can be seen in many published period photographs of that redwood home, which overlooks the ocean. Additionally, a redwood chest of drawers with leather straps for pulls designed by San Diego architects Richard Requa and Frank Mead for Hopi House, a Pueblo Revival home near the Bailey house, is also on view. A carved bench by William Templeton Johnson that was commissioned by the Marstons for their garden and is a part of the museum's permanent collection completes the exhibit of early 20th-century architect-designed furniture.

Sign up for Keith's 'Architecture Daily' by emailing him HERE.


Captain & Mrs. A.J. Peterson Residence (1963) by Homer Delawie

Sunday November 21, 2010

The new owner of Homer Delawie's Captain & Mrs. A.J. Peterson Residence (ca. 1963) located at 1010 Glorietta Blvd in Coronado was just denied his demolition permit. Purchasing the home in April for $1.75M Mark Gosselin, having been informed by the MLS listing that the home was designed by Delawie, the new owner sought to tear down the house to build a substantially larger home (the Peterson Residence measures 1,700 sq ft) on the lot. Last Tuesday the Coronado City Council voted 4-1 in closed session to deny the demolition permit. According to the UT, Councilwoman Carrie Downey cast the dissenting vote. According to the UT, owner Gosselin argued, "First of all, the house is not historical...It's pretty much in tear down condition. It's been in ill-repair for 10 years now." A number of preservationists and neighbors in the area campaigned to clamp down on the demolition permit - but the question now is can they halt any alterations and remodel plans just shy of 'demolition'...? The blog Coronado Commone Sense covered the proceedings and offers insight into the buyer's claim that this is 'hardship' for them. It is sad that their architect and real estate agent both spoke at a public hearing in favor of the demolition -- doing both professions a disservice. Learn more about Homer Delawie HERE. See MercerYork's Listing for Delawie's 3rd Home HERE.

Slated for February 17-27, 2011 Palm Springs Modernism Week will feature many of the audience favorites such as the annual architecture symposium, the Architecture and Design film series in association with DesignOnscreen, lectures, the vintage car show and other activities that will be held in various venues throughout the City. The popular architecture tours which often sell-out will now be offered every day from Saturday the 19th thru Sunday the 27th due to popular demand, twice a day on weekends and once a day on week days. There will be several home tours, two of them organized by MODERNISM WEEK and others organized by neighborhood associations. Event producers are also planning a 'Design Lecture Series' and a tribute to mid century fashion. Learn more HERE.

The new book Handcrafted Modern is an intimate and revealing collection of photographs of astonishingly beautiful, iconic, and undiscovered mid-century interiors. This collection of newly commissioned photographs presents the most compelling homes by influential mid-century designers, such as Russel Wright, George Nakashima, Harry Bertoia, Charles and Ray Eames, and Eva Zeisel, among others. Intimate as well as revelatory, Williamson's photographs show these creative homes as they were lived in by their designers: Walter Gropius's historic Bauhaus home in Massachusetts; Albert Frey's floating modernist aerie on a Palm Springs rock outcropping; Wharton Esherick's completely handmade Pennsylvania house, from the organic handcarved staircase to the iconic furniture. Buy it HERE.

Since its founding in 1963, Hennessey + Ingalls has grown to become the largest art and architecture bookstore in the western United States. While their Santa Monica store is 'trick', their online holiday discounts (20%) are a real 'treat'. Check out their online store HERE.

Alvin Lustig was modern before it was cool. But there has never been a monograph devoted to his work-until now. A genius best known for his book covers and interior design, his theories on design education were precursors to the curricula of some of the most renowned design schools today. Lustig lent his imaginative vision and talent to a wide range of legendary projects, from the groundbreaking architecture of 1940s Los Angeles to magazine covers that have become collector's items. Spanning the breadth of Lustig's tragically brief but prolific career, the new book Born Modern is a must-have for any student or practitioner of design, as well as anyone interested in the history of American visual culture. Buy it HERE.

Surprisingly, two items failed to sell at the Orchids & Onions Silent Auction last week. Chris Puzio's sculpture was valued at $7,000, and the staring bid was listed at $3,500. Matt Devine's study for a monumental sculpture was valued at $1,000, and bids started at $500. Also available are two signed copies of Homer Delawie's book valued at $200. The small edition of this publication warrants a decent price, but having it signed by Homer before his passing is pricess. Drop Keith a line HERE for more details.

Last month tenants vacated the landmark Manufacturers Trust Company building in New York City and in the process, dismantled and removed from the building a monumental work by Harry Bertoia. Completed in 1954, the Manufacturers Trust Company branch building at 510 Fifth Avenue in New York City by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill housed a unique interior feature by sculptor Harry Bertoia. The  70-ft screen, constructed of steel fused on the surface with bronze, copper and nickel plates, was installed to separate the bank customers from bank officers, serving as a divider between the banking hall and rear offices. The building is a New York City landmark, designated in 1997, but the designation applies only to the exterior, leaving interior details such as the Bertoia screen unprotected.  While the sculpture is purported to be in storage, its ultimate fate remains unknown.

Tracing residential designs of Brazilian Modernists from 1927 to 2010, in his new book, Casa Modernista, author Alan Hess notes that not only did Brazil master the fundamentals of Modern design, it launched into a creative expansion of theory and practice that astounded the world. Many of Brazil's architects were the equal of Oscar Niemeyer as they re-shaped (and continue to evolve) the rapidly developing nation in the image of Modernism. Read a review HERE.Buy it HERE.

Now that the late Frances Brody's other heirs have received their shares of her fortune, the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens has a much clearer idea of its own windfall from the L.A. art patron's estate: a gift expected to well exceed $100 million. Compare this to David Rockefeller's $100-million pledge to the Museum of Modern Art (in 2005), which ranks as its largest-ever cash gift. In 2008, Leonard Lauder's art foundation gave $131 million to the Whitney Museum of American Art, also its largest. Frances Brody died in November 2009 at age 93, leaving behind a wealth of artwork - including Giacometti bronzes and Matisse paintings including a key Picasso. When the art world witnessed Christie's sell several of Brody's masterpieces in May, led by Picasso's "Nude, Green Leaves and Bust" for $106.5 million (which set a record as the most expensive work of art ever sold at auction), the Huntington saw the charitable gift grow sizeably in real time. Read the full LA Times article HERE.

Released a few years ago, we continue to reference A. QUINCY JONES (Phaidon) - both for pure entertainment and for continued research into Jones' work here in San Diego. With such a distinguished career it is still hard to believe that this is the first book published on Los Angeles architect Archibald Quincy ('A.Q.') Jones (1913-1979), a pioneer in affordable housing designed with a modern aesthetic. The introductory essay traces Jones's life and career, his post-war planning projects and his long association with Palo Alto building magnate Joseph Eichler. The book, a catalogue of sixty of Jones's projects illustrated with high-quality black and white period photographs, as well as plans and renderings by Jones, are quintessential examples of mid-twentieth-century American architecture. Learn more HERE and buy it HERE.


Sim Bruce Richards' Edward P. Silva Residence (in Point Loma) is up for sale.
Learn more HERE. Vintage photograph by Douglas Simmonds.

Tuesday November 15, 2010

OBJECTS USA will hold their 'Fall '10' sale the weekend of November 19-21. The sale launches with an opening reception on Friday the 19th between 7-9pm at 1946 Broadway in Golden Hill. On hand will be vintage works by mid-century San Diegans including members of the Allied Craftsmen. More information can be found HERE.

The 58th year  of the All Souls' Saint Nicholas Home Tour is slated for 12/4 between 10a-4p. This year, registrants will tour  four Point Loma homes including those of singer Frankie Laine, architect Homer Delawie, and Mr. and Mrs. John Wertz, as well as "Casa Marrero" a 1927 Richard Requa - Herbert Jackson designed Spanish Colonial Revival Style home with historical designation. The Delawie is currently listed by Mercer York Real Estate. For more information go HERE.

Rising from relative obscurity decades ago, building designer and entrepreneur, Craig Ellwood, is now represented in 4 monographs on his (and his firm partners') work. Thanks in part to John Entenza and Arts + Architecture magazine, he will forever be a Case Study architect... Esther McCoy's original monograph, simply titled Craig Ellwood, printed only in hardcover in 1968 is still available (now in soft cover only) from Hennesy & Ingalls. Check it out HERE. In 1999 Alfonso Perez-Mendez published Craig Ellwood 15 Houses as a volume of 2G. It is barely available, but you can find them on Amazon and Ebay fairly frequently. See it HERE. What may stand as the most definitive biographical portrait of Ellwood, Neil Jackson's 2002 hardcover California Modern: The Architecture of Craig Ellwood, is a fascinating read. Learn more HERE. Alfonso Perez-Mendez' 2nd publication on the topic, Craig Ellwood in the Spirit of the Time, boasts the most complete photographic collection of Ellwood's projects. Find it HERE.

The Phaidon publishing imprint has a fantastic site - and it's not just about their books. Check out articles about Arne Jacobsen's SAS House; this year's winning designs from the Architect of the Year Awards; and a whole lot more HERE.

Raphael Soriano was one of the early Case Study architects working in postwar Los Angeles. This first monograph on Soriano, providing a comprehensive study of the architect's life and oeuvre. It includes detailed descriptions of thirty key Soriano buildings, and a listing of Complete Works that documents for the first time every known project in Soriano's archive. More than twenty of Soriano's buildings have been destroyed and many others remodeled beyond recognition. While this book is nearly a decade old, it offers the only published record of these important works. Read more HERE.

While widely known as a book designer in the 1930s through the 1950s, Alvin Lustig's career in Los Angeles spanned furniture and lighting design and architecture. Though his diabetes progressed through blindness and played a key role in his death, at age 40 in 1955, a short career has left an indelible mark on several arenas of post-war design. Key to memorializing Lustig's work is a fantastic, comprehensive site designed by true fans of his oeuvre. Check it out HERE.

Warhol and Lichtenstein, vied for bragging rights at Christie's recent auction of postwar and contemporary art. Although Warhol dominated sales at Phillips de Pury and Sotheby's earlier in the week, Lichtenstein managed to take the lead. His 1964 painting "Ohhh ... Alright ...," a comic book image of a forlorn woman clutching a telephone, brought $38 million, or $42.6 million including Christie's fees, a record for the artist at auction. That was just under its estimate of $40 million but well above what was paid for a similarly valued Warhol. Read the full article HERE.


Sim Bruce Richards' Edward P. Silva Residence (in Point Loma) is up for sale.
Learn more HERE. Vintage photograph by Douglas Simmonds.

Wednesday November 10, 2010

One of our favorite regional post-war architects of all time is Gordon Drake. While Drake only designed one home in San Diego, the Max Drake Residence (ca. 1937) in Coronado, interest among afficianadoes has not waned. In fact William Stout Publishers has just reissued the only text on the subject 'California Houses of Gordon Drake.' Orginally scribed by Douglas Baylis and Joan Parry, the new book includes an introduction by Pierluigi Serraino (author of 'Modernism Rediscovered'). Killed tragically in a skiing accident in 1952, Drake is buried at Ft. Rosecrans in Point Loma.Learn more about the book HERE. Read an article on Drake by Craig Ellwood biographer, Neil Jackson, HERE. Read the 'Annotated and Illustrated Bibliography' on Drake HERE.

Jon Platt, Tony Award-winning producer of "Angels in America" and "God of Carnage" and a current producer of "Wicked" on Broadway, moved into Frank Gehry's Schnabel House in Brentwood in 2006. His work updating the house includes iPad control of the house's working parts. Read more HERE.

The Structure of Light tells the story of the career of Richard Kelly, the lighting designer behind Philip Johnson's Glass House; Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum; Eero Saarinen's GM Technical Center; and Mies van der Rohe's Seagram Building and our own Timken Museum in Balboa Park. Learn more HERE.

While widely known as a book designer in the 1930s through the 1950s, Alvin Lustig's career in Los Angeles spanned furniture and lighting design and architecture. Though his diabetes progressed through blindness and played a key role in his death, at age 40 in 1955, a short career has left an indelible mark on several arenas of post-war design. Key to memorializing Lustig's work is a fantastic, comprehensive site designed by true fans of his oeuvre. Check it out HERE.

Raphael Soriano was one of the early Case Study architects working in postwar Los Angeles. This first monograph on Soriano, providing a comprehensive study of the architect's life and oeuvre. It includes detailed descriptions of thirty key Soriano buildings, and a listing of Complete Works that documents for the first time every known project in Soriano's archive. More than twenty of Soriano's buildings have been destroyed and many others remodeled beyond recognition. While this book is nearly a decade old, it offers the only published record of these important works. Read more HERE.

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